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Lebaoon Valley Coflle 



THE FINEST THINGS IN COLLEGE 
Creations Come From 

THE COLLEGE BOOK 
STORE 

We are in a Position to Assist You with 
GIFT SUGGESTIONS 



THRIFT 

Friend — "You are having quite a long siege of illness." 

The Invalid — "But that was such a big bottle of medicine the 
doctor gave me, and I can't think of getting well a letting all that 
expensive prescription go to waste." 



DEFINED 

"Blank is a super-egotist." 
"And what's that?" 

"A super-egotist is a man who thinks the world thinks as well 
of him as he thinks of himself." 



THE BOSS WAS THERE BEFORE 

She — "What did your boss say when you told him you took me 
to the football game?" 

He — "He gave me his sympathy when I told him I had to 
explain all the plays to you." 



Ladies' and Gents 
Furnishings 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Student's Discount 
Packard and Am- 
erican Lady 

SHOES 
Arrow Collars 
and 
SHIRTS 



"Say it with 

Flowers" 
The Flower 
Shop 

19-21 North Eighth St. 
NURSERIES: 

Front and Maipie Ste. 
Bell Phone 

LEBANON, PA. 



Satisfy 
Yourself 

Eat Burdan's Ice 
lOrealn aft the 

Ideal 
Restaurant 

I. H. ROEMIG 
Ladies' Room 



The Cruci 





The Boat That Never Was Built 

Elmer Hodge pulled up his suspenders with a resentful jerk, and 
slouched down across the sunny road to the boat house. A decisive bang 
of the kitchen screen door quickened his lagging pace, and set him to rumir 
nating on the cause of ail his grievances. Emmy was' acting "most un- 
natural-like for the wife of an easy-goin' man" like himself these days. 
Years ago she. had nagged him enough about fixing the gate and the front 
doorstep, but now just because he was waiting for the lumber his father 
had left in the old loft to get ripe and seasoned enough to build a good, 
stout boat, she persisted in burning his steak every meal. Women were 
"durned uncomfortable" at times. 

The boat had been a bone of contention in the Hodge household for 
three years. Each spring Elmer fully intended to make a fair-sized row- 
boat, which his two boys could take to 1 the picnic grounds a mile up the 
river, and earn a dollar or two at the ferry. It had been Emmy's sug- 
gestion in the first place, for she knew he was clever enough with his tools 
if she ever got him started. 

Elmer pushed open the creaking door of the old paintless shed, chewed 
a minute or two in further reflection, and set to work. He carried his 
lumber from the loft, and dropped it with a hollow plunk on the grass 
outside the boat-house. He supposed the half-inch boards would be heavy 
enough, and anyhow he could use that heavy oak timber another time. 

He soon felt hot as blazes, under the scorching August sun, and was 
sweating like a horse. He hoped sarcastically that Emmaline wouldn't 
mind if he stopped to mop his steaming forehead. Every time he looked 
up toward the house, there she sat on the back porch peeling baking apples 
and keeping an ever-watchful eye on his saw and hammer. With a sigh 
of relief, he looked up to see Isaac Simons approaQhing. Isaac lived on the 
next farm, and was a born adviser in all undertakings. 

"Mornin', Elmer," he squinted through his spectacles, "I see you're 
buildin' yer boat at last." 

Elmer chewed cn in silence and stuffed the old blue bandanna back 
into his overall pocket. 

"I'm glad to see yer workin'," continued the cheerful comment, "but 
let me tell yer one thing. That there lumber will nary make a boat," tap- 



2 



THE CRUCIBLE 



ping the boards with his cane; "It's chestnut, and it's too thin. Why, my 
Grandfather Barnes onct built a boat, and he said — " 

Then followed a wordy discussion on how his grandfather, and every- 
one else's grandfather built a boat. When the last bit of illumination on 
the subject of water-crafts had been imparted, Elmer said: 

"Mebbe you're right," and went to look for the old oak timbers, while 
friend Isaac hobbled off, stirring up miniature volcanoes with everv prod 
of his cane in the dusty road. Elmer worked away rather steadilv on his 
new supply of lumber, until young Cal. Strine came driving by in his 
father's new red-wheeled buggy. Cal was the community's one connoisseur 
of haberdashery and man of the world. He had been to both Allentown 
and Phoenixville, and once had attended an Elk's convention at Atlantic 
City. 

"How are you, Hodge," he called, as he carefully lifted the tail of his 
hugely-checkered coat over the buggy wheel. He dusted his tan walkers 
with a handful of clover, and exclaimed: 

"A new boat, indeed! Rather warm for such work, but how fine for 
the Strinestown picnic next month. You are building it with the latest 
bottom, of course. Why, at Allentown park, you don't see anything else." 

And there was much more concerning the flat-bottomed boats which 
young Cal assured the unenthused Elmer were the height of fashion at 
recreation parks in all large cities. In fact, it was the only way to build 
a boat. 

Elmer bit off a new chunk of tobacco and agreed dispiritedly. 

"Mebbe you're right." He started sawing the boards at new lengths 
after the buggy and its occupanfl had rattled over the rise in the hill road. 

Two hours later, Emmy came down to view the progress herself. She 
was hot, she was tired, she was angry. There stood Elmer, one hand in 
his pocket, the other scratching his head in perplexity. 

"I see you're workin'," was her opening conciliatory remark. She peered 
over the top of her spectacles at the short pieces of board lying around 
on the ground. 

"Elmer Hodge! What| in the name of common sense are you making? 
A potato bin or a boat?" 

Then came the avalanche. All the annoyances which her order-loving 
soul had endured for years in silence were hurled in righteous indignation 
at his two-colored head. He raised a weak remonstrating hand, and sat 
down limply on the pile of boards to mop his brow. 

"Mebbe you're right," he murmured from force of habit. 

"No mebbe about it! Now build that boat, and don't show up until 
it's done," was the heated retort, and Emmaline flounced back to hei 
kitchen. 

Elmer, still a bit shaken from his usual calm, climbed up the steps 
to the loft to bring new timbers to build the boat as long and shapely as 
the hand of his unrelenting Fate had decreed. He supposed there were 
longer beams back under the eaves. He remembered sawing up a few for 
the chicken coop several years ago, but there were quite a few when his 
father was living. He looked long and then anxiously. He pushed aside 
the shingles and wagon parts feverishly. He swallowed his tobacco in a 
sudden gulp of terror. There were no timbers there! 

Some say Elmer spent the night in the boat-house. Others say Em- 
maline took fright and called him in at midnight. But all the neighbors 
tell of the odor of burned steak that emanated from the Hodge farmhouse 
at meal time. At any rate, Elmer was a changed man, and at the least 
suggestion that fell from his wife's lips, would assert hastily, 

"You're right, Emmy, of course you're right." 

E. VIRGINIA SMITH, '20. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



3 




THE CRUCIBLE 



Vol. VIII. Annville, Pa., Thursday, Dec. 11, 1919. 



No. 6. 



Editor in Chief 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '20. 

Associate Editors 
IDA BOMBE R GER , '21. 
ORIN J. FARRELL, '21. 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21. 
Literary Athletics 
OLIVE E. DARLING, '21. F. DOUGLAS BEIDEL, '20. 

RHODES STABLEY, '22 Ass't. GASTON VANDENBOSCH, '23, Ass't. 

Alumni Editor 
Activities CARROLL DAUGHERTY, '21. 

VERNA E. MUTCH, '20. Music Editor, 

HAROLD LUTZ, '23 Ass't. WILLIAM HERRING, '20. 

Business Managers 
CHARLES C. HARTMiAN, '20. 
Assistants 
ELWOOD HEISS, '21. 
GEORGE HOHL. '23. 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23. 
RODNEY KREIDER, '22. 
Entered as second class matter, November 12, 1910, at the Postomce 
at Annville, Pa., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 15c each. 
Address all business communications to Charles Hartman, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's hands before the first 
and third Monday of each moim- 



"The King is Dead Long live the King!" has ever been the cry 

when the death of a monarch is announced and his successor chosen, 
the cry indicating remembrance of the departed ruler and loyalty and 
devotion to the one who follows him. 

It is hoped that this is the spirit with which this first issue of "THE 
CRUCIBLE" is received. The College News is dead; let us do all in our 
power to insure the success of "THE CRUCIBLE." 

The present name is the suggestion of Mr. Stumbaugh, being chosen 
i'roM a list ot thirty-four submitted names) by a committee composed cf 
two faculty members, two alumni members and two members of the stu- 
dent body, with Dr. Gossard, Prof. Peatty and the Editor as advisory 



4 



THE CRUCIBLE 



members. 

The idea of THE CRUCIBLE, as interpreted by Mr. Stumbaugh, is 
that the paper should be a melting pot in which all of the activities of 
the school are digested and refined. It is to this end that the staff will 
labour, and they invite criticism and suggestions from any one interested. 




In compliance with a number of requests from alumni and friends of 
Lebanon Valley interested in the success of her endowment campaign, the 
following statement of the financial condition of the college with special 
reference to the endowment campaign is given: 



Total amount of endowment subscribed $385,000.00 

Amount required to launch drive : 23,000.00 

Total subscribed endowment $362,000.00 

Amount paid in first year 132,660.77 

Amount paid in second year to date 73,730.38 

Amount yielding 5 per cent 147,391.15 

Amount of old endowment 68,000.00 



Total endowment to date . $215,391.15 



In spite of this apparently promising outlook, Lebanon Valley faces a 
deficit for the current year of from eight to ten thousand dollars. This 
deficit being due to the unprecedented high prices, general improvements 
and to an increase to faculty and employes to the amount of $5,500 over 
the pay roll of last year. 



Scientific Society 

Tuesday evening, December 2nd, the Scientific Society met in regular 
session. At this meeting the newly-elected president, Mr. Mease, gave an 
interesting lecture on "Signal Methods in Use in the U. S. Army." Mr. 
Mease was master of his subject, having been in charge of signal apparatus 
for his batallion during active service in France. 

Miss Hibbs also read a very interesting paper on current scientific sub- 
jects, her paper being a review of the most recent issues of the Scientific 
American. 



Athletic Council Awards Foot Ball "L's" 

At a recent meeting of the Athletic Council the Varsity letter was 
granted to the following men: Capt. Fishburn, Kleinfelter, Wine, Berger, 
Bachman, Moore, Uhler, Renn, Homan, Harvey, Giles, Shumaker, Sharosky, 
Beck.Behman, Clemens and Manager Hagy. By a ruling of the Council, 
any player who has played in at least sixteen quarters, in which any part 
of the Albright game shall count as a full game, is entitled to wear the 
coveted "L". The following men shall be lost to the squad by graduation: 
Fishburn, Kleinfelter, Wine, Berger and Bachman. 

Roland Renn, '21, has been selected by the foot ball letter men to 
pilot the Varsity next season. Renn is a product of Harrisburg Central 
High, where he won fame as an all around athlete. He has also played 
on the Bloomsburg Normal eleven. We congratulate Mr. Renn on the high 
honor accorded him in recognition of his ability and enthusiasm as a player 
and compliment the letter men in their selection of such an able and 
worthy leader. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



5 



Clio Anniversary 

November the twenty-first brought to the eager students of L. V. 
one of the most welcome events of the whole school year — Clio Anniver- 
sary. The program was of the kind that leaves with the hearer the feeling 
that it was the best he ever heard. 

The invocation was offered by Mrs. A. E. Schroyer. Virginia Smith, 
president of Clio, then extended a greeting of welcome to the friends of 
Clio and delivered an address on "The Appeal of Greek Sculpture." The 
serious vein of her theme was varied by delightful spots of humor; the 
purport of the oration was the Hellenic gospel of Beauty. Miss Smith pre- 
pared the way of each subsequent speaker with a humorous introduction. 

Every one was delighted when Myrle Saylor appeared on the stage and 
she afforded a well-appreciated treat by the rendition of two beautiful 
songs. 

"These Twain" was the subject of Myrtle Lefever's oration. She show- 
ed the comparative position of man and woman — as it was formerly, as 
it is, and as it should and will be. 

Verna Mutch showed some of the aesthetic achievements of war — • 
especially of the recent war — in her discourse on "The Poetry of War." 

Clio chorus then appeared on the stage and sang "The Scarf Danco." 

Finally came the reading of Helena Maulfair. It was Henry Van 
Dyke's beautiful story, "The Lost Word." Miss Maulfair held the audi- 
ence in the grip of intense interest up to the last dramatic moment. 

The program was interspersed with music by Loser's orchestra. When 
it was ended everyone gladly accepted the president's invitation to go to 
the gymnasium for the reception where dainty refreshments were served 
and a pleasant social hour was enjoyed. 



The Faculty Entertained 

One evening late in November, Dr. and Mrs. Gossard betook them- 
selves to the task of "making merry" the Faculty. 

The event was a Progressive Art party. Five art lessons were given 
to eacfi group and it was remarkable how rapidly they advanced. The 
first lesson was one in clay modeling, and the specimens proved to be 
anything from a lily to a salamander. 

The second undertaking was sculpture. Here the question was, 
"What Can, You See in a Potato?" Alter applying the "chisel" with perfect 
accuracy, the prize winner produced an Irishman. 

At the sketching table the "art students" were provided with needle 
and thread, and a piece of linen, — needle and thread serving as drawing 
pencil. The sketches produced were very unique and shall remain as 
curios of the ocasion. 

Portrait painting was the next step. Each one drew a Portrait of 
his neignoor, ana tlie novel expressions, and coiuures, were the "outstand- 
ing" merits of. these creations. 

The last lesson was in water color work. The combining and mixing 
of cotor wub uweu upon, and tne results were "visible" indeed. Daylight, 
however, is necessary to fully appreciate them. 

Delightful refreshments were their "certificates of art," and at a late 
hour an uonnea "cap anu gown " and went out into the night. 



6 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Y. M. C. A. 

Much activity has been shown by the College Y. M. C. A. during the 
past three weeks. In that period, largely through their effofts, the stu- 
dents have been privileged to hear several helpful discussions by three 
lecturers and to see several reels of enlightening motion pictures. 

The first of the three speakers was Dr. F. C. Clark, of Chicago, a 
widely known lecturer who is working under the International Y. M. C. A. 
On Tuesday, November 18th, at 4 o'clock, Dr. Clark gave the girls of the 
school some valuable instruction in regard to "See Hygiene" and at 8 
o'clock in the evening he lectured on the same subject to a male audience. 

An unusual subject, "What A Man Has in His Pocket," was discussed 
on Tuesday evening, Nov. 25th, by Charles Kelchner, athletic instructor 
for the jueoanon Y. M. C. A. and a staunch friend of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, uebpite his former Albright connections. His was a commonplace 
subject, but his lecture was by no means of the same character. Declar- 
ing that what a man has in his pocket is an indicator of what he has in 
his heart, Mr. Kelchner pleaded with his hearers to clean out the inner 
man and then be as clean inwardly as they would appear outwardly. His 
message was one of great helpfulness and interest to the students. 

On Monday, December 1st, Dr. James Coleman, a former college 
professor, now a lecturer on social and ethical topics, came to the college 
to present a series of four lectures. He delivered the first of his expo- 
sitions at chapel services Tuesday morning, the second at 6 o'clock Tues- 
day evening, tire third at 5:15 o'clock Wednesday evening, and the fourth 
at the Thursday morning chapel services. Dr. Coleman impressed the stu- 
dents with the fact that upon their shoulders will devolve the task of 
solving the social problems of the coming days and appealed to them to 
carefully prepare themselves for that task. 

Free movies were shown in the chapel on Saturday evening, Nov. 22, 
and on the following Monday evening, the films shown being "Come 
Clean," and "The Price of Peace." 



Star Course 

The Conservatory Chapel was the scene of unusual activity Saturday 
night, December 6th. The Chatauqua program began at 6:45, and Ann- 
viile's host of spectators left the auditorium at 9 o'clock well pleased. 
A final concert was given by the Rollers Musical Club, all accomplished 
artists, followed by a lengthy, though interesting lecture by the eloquent 
Dr. Bohn, on the theme, "Revolutionary Europe." He pointed out the 
underlying features in connection with the popular discontent and the 
oniy possible solution to the perplexing problems. 

The Star Course lived up to its reputation and again furnished us 
with a pleasing entertainment, by extra fine talent. The Stallings Trio, 
featuring Miss Louise Stallings, soloist, proved to be of extra fine calibre. 
Miss Stallings sang a number of French songs, made interesting by the 
humorous element; later she rendered a series of songs written by Rus- 
sian masters, and the technique and expression with which she gave them 
held her audience spellbound. Mr. Rubin, a celebrated cellist, rendered a 
number of selections, besides playing the obligato part to several operatic 
selections by Miss Stallings. Miss Carley, the pianist, played a number 
ol solos, showing perfect technique in the masterly way in which she 
made the soul of the piano talk. The delightful program closed with the 
rendition of six American folk songs by Miss Stallings. It was an evening 
well spent. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



7 



Delegates Elected To Des Moines Con- 
vention 

The Eighth International Convention of the Student Volunteers will 
be held at Des Moines, Iowa, December 31, 1919 to January 4, 1920. Six 
thousand chosen students and professors from practically every college 
and university of the United States and Canada will be there. They are 
meeting together for the purpose of actually facing the situation in the 
world today and of considering the responsibility of the American college 
mon and women in regard to the serious problem which must be solved. 
With many of the foremost Christian leaders and statesmen from all parts 
of the world as speakers, it is needless to say that this convention bids 
fair to prove the foremost event in the student world this year, something 
which no college can afford to miss. 

Myrtle M. Lefever, '20; Mary Bortner, '21; and Edgar C. Hastings, '21, 
have been chosen to represent our own college. We consider it a great 
privilege to be represented at this convention. 



Elvegrams 

It was Friday afternoon at four and the day was dark and cold; 
eleven Soph'mores stumped their toes and watched the Freshmen fold 
come stampeding down across the field like warriors crazed and mad; 
the two lines crashed with an awful boom and the sight we saw was sad; 
the air was full of struggling feet, the ground was jammed with brains; 
with digs for keeps, a punch or two and boiling blood in their veins, they 
crawled apart and started play (when love was all forgot) ; a rush, a 
crash, another rush, the fight was surely hot; with sure advance, 'mid 
thund'rous cheer from yelling friends and mates, the Sophs, like champs, 
rushed down the field with the Freshmen feet on skates; they took the 
ball across the line; a dandy goal was made; yet the Freshmen fought 
with pep and pluck, with spirits undismayed. Through four long quar- 
ters stormed the fight with wallops, bangs galore, and many a snorting 
warrior haC Ms face besmeared with gore. At the final gong, the Sophs 
had won, had triumphed in the fight; with voices strong, exultant, mates 
and cousins yelled with might; but we were proud of the Freshmen squad, 
for they had fougnt like men; they played the game with the pep and 
pluck of the true American. 

So let's gather round with will, ye Sophs, ye lads and every lass, and 
give three rousing, roaring cheers for our pals — the Freshman class. 

ONLEE A. SOPH. 



FOOTBALL BANQUET 

On Tuesday evening, December 9th, the Athletic Council tendered the 
annual banquet to our entire foot ball squad in the College Dining Hall. 
Besides the members of the Council and several professors, forty mem- 
bers of this season's squad and a dozen prominent scholastic foot ball boys 
partook of the unusual elegant repast prepared by our jovial "chef." Our 
boys showed a varied attack and many new formations in the early part 
of the battle, but their defense weakened toward the end when "turkey," 
always a stror ; man for the visitors, was pushed over for the only score. 
Chaplain Shroyer rose to the occasion beautifully as commander-in-chief 
of the allied forces. General Gossard, Surgeon Rutherford, "Rookie" 
Beatty, Athletic Officer Strickler, Private Hagy, Capt. Fishburn, and Lieut. 
Renn made delightful toasts. 



r 



8 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Delaware 20, L. V. 7 

Lebanon Valley closed its foot ball season at Newark, Delaware, 
losing to the strong Delaware College eleven, 20 to 7. Our boys put up 
an excellent game, but were outclassed by their opponents. 

L. V. kicked to Delaware and held them for downs, causing a kick. 
After an exchange of punts Harvey intercepted a forward pass on our 
40-yard line. By a succession of off tackle plays our team marched through 
tne Delaware line with little difficulty, Moore crossing the goal line for a 
touch down. Behman kicked the goal. 

in the second quarter Delaware came back strong and had little dif- 
ficulty in scoring. By a large variety of open field plays, forward passes, 
end line plunges, they succeeded in scoring two touch downs, and kicked 
one goal from touch down. The first half ended with Delaware leading 
13 to 7. 

The third period opened with L. V. receiving the kick off. Both teams 
showed brilliant defensive playing and neither team being able to gain 
ground, the game resolved itself into a kicking duel, with Capt. Fish- 
burn holding his own. No scoring was done during this period. 

Our team entered the final period without the services of Berger, 
Homan and Kleinfelter, who had been lost by injuries. This weakened 
our team considerably, but the boys fought gamely to the last. Delaware 
aeain scored in the last two minutes of play, and kicked the goal. Final 
score, Delaware 20, L. V. 7. 

All of our team played a flashy game, especially Capt. Fishburn, Wine 
and Behmen. Moore showed exceptional good judgment in his selection 
of plays. 



Freshmen Beaten by Sophomores, 7-0 

Friday, December the 8th, saw the annual Fresh-Soph foot ball classic. 
The Sophomores triumphed by the score of 7 to 0, The contest was fea- 
ured by many sensational plays on both sides, and until the blowing of 
the final whistle the outcome of the tilt was uncertain. 

The Sophomores got the hop on the Freshmen in the early stages of 
the game when they received the ball on downs on the 40 -yard line. The 
Freshmen braced and the Sophs were unable to gain on line plunges. A 
perfect forward pass, Herr to Homan, gained 25 yards, and placed the 
ball on the 8 yard njark. Herr on the next play swung wide around right 
end making the only score of the game. Herr also kicked the goal, making 
the score 7-0. 

The Freshmen came back strong in the second half and outplayed the 
Sophs, threatening to score many times, but always lacked the final punch 
to cross the line. 

The game was one of the cleanest inter-class contests seen about 
college for some time, both teams battling gamely until the blowing of 
the final whistle. Homan, Herr, Shadel and A. Miller played best for the 
Sophs, while Beck, Stauffer and Smith excelled for the first year men. 



Basket Ball 

Basket ball season opened with victory Wednesday evening, December 
10th, when the basket ball team opened their season with the strong Leba- 
non Y. M. C. A. team. The game was hotly contested until the last minute 
of play, the final score being 46-38, in favor of Lebanon Valley. Seltzer 
and Moore were individual stars for Lebanon Valley. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



9 



News of Our Akmni 

Rev. Howard Olewiler, '14, and wife, formerly Ruth Quigley, of 
the same class, are residing at Wilkinsburgh, Pa., where Rev. Olewiler 
occupies the position of assistant pastor of the First Presbyterian church. 
Rev. Olewiler has been the recipient of a number of very complimentary 
offers from important Presbyterian churches in the western part of this 
State. 

Lester L. Spessard, '11, who recently returned from service over-seas, 
has been called to a lucrative position with the Federal Horticultural Board, 
Washington, D. C. During the last week or two he has been in New York 
City, assisting in the inspection of horticultural material from foreign 
countries. 

Rev. George D. Owen, '05, has met with marked success in his chosen 
field of endeavor. At present he is pastor of the Smithfield Avenue Church, 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island. The Congregational Church has, indeed, been 
fortunate in securing such a capable man. The seven years preceding this 
last position were spent by Rev. Owen as the head of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Thomaston, Connecticut. During his pastorate there, he 
was elected to the House Representatives of the State of Connecticut. 
Needless to say, Rev. Owen was equally successful in his legislative and 
ministerial work. One special feature of his work at Thomaston was a 
Go-to-Church Band that met with much success. An account of it has 
appeared in a recent issue of the religious magazine, "The Expositor." 
During the war, Rev. Owen was an official speaker for the State Council 
of Defense at numerous war rallies. He was also Educational and Re- 
ligious Secretary for the Y. M. C. A. at Fort Terry, N. Y., during the sum- 
mer of 1918. Since coming to Pawtucket, March 1, 1919, Rev. Owen 
has had large interests and has been in large movements. We can predict 
for him nothing but great success. 

Following his discharge from the army, after service overseas as a first 
lieutenant, S. Huber Heintzelman, of Chambersburg, a member of the class 
of 1916, has accepted a position as Y. M. C. A. Secretary at Burnwell, West 
Virginia. Mr. Heintzelman was engaged in similar work prior to entering 
the army. 

John K. Lehman, '11, and his wife, nee Helen Weidler, also '11, an- 
nounce the birth of a' baby girl, Friday, the twenty-eighth of November, 
1919. Mr. Lehman holds an important position as chemist and investigator 
of dye stuffs in the Semet-Solvay plant at Detroit, Michigan. 

The Yale News announces that Charles Vincent Henry, Jr., of the 
class of 1919 at Yale, and a former member of the class of '18, L. V. C, 
has been awarded Senior Honors of the Third Rank in History. 

Stanley R. Oldham, '08, is at present principal of the Maine Central 
Institute located at Pittsfield, Maine. A novel method is employed in 
the publication of the news of his school. Every week the school paper 
comes out as a part of the town newspaper, thus securing a large group 
of readers. This idea has been taken up by professors of various other 
schools and colleges, and is proving to be a pioneer in its field. 

During the past season Lebanon Valley has had reason to be proud 
of the athletes that she has developed. Henry Haines, ex '20, succeeded 
in winning a. berth on the now famous Penn State football team. "Hinky," 
as he used to be known here, played halfback in several games until 
forced out by injuries. He is also a basket ball and base ball player of 
exceptional ability, and doubtless will be seen again on the teams of his 
new Alma Mater. 

Norman C. Schlichter, of the class of 1897, is located in the Industrial 
Department of the Y. M. C. A. in Chicago. He is the secretary of the 
Intelligence Commission, and has his headquarters in the city of Chicago. 



10 



THE CRUCIBLE 



STYLE THAT COMMENDS YOUR 
TASTE 

Good taste is the first requisite of a good impression. Seek 
style in your clothes by all means — but don't mistake "frills 
and flounces" for smartness. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

possess style and give you poise and personality — 'they can't 
change your Character, but they reflect taste and make other 
men welcome your society. Always all wool. 

Try our dependable store for your next suit or overcoat. 

MANUFACTURERS CLOTHING CO. 

.Style Headquarters — The Home* of Society Brand. 
725 CUMBERLAND STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



BOYER'S 

the Best Place for all kinds of 
FINE STATIONERY, BLANK 
BOOKS, LOOSE LEAF AND 
MEMO BOOKS. 

Popular 

Fiction 

Pennants and Cushion Tops. 
L. V. C. Seal Jewelry 

Kodaks and Film 

Developing and Printing 

Snapshot Albums 

Fountain Pens, Flash Lights, 
TOys, Games, Books, Decora- 
tions. 

19 WEST MAIN STREET 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Efficient Servfice Patronize 
the 

Hershey Laundry 

We are the Best Equipped. 
All work guaranteed. 
Full Dress Work a Specialty. 

Stine and Strine 

AGENTS 

Photographs of 
Quality 
BLAZIER'S 
STUDIO 

LEBANON, PA. 
Help (to Identify You. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



11 



Bowman's Model 
BAKERY 

FOR QUALITY 

Bread, Cakes, Buns, 
Pies, Cream Puffs, 
Doughnuts and 

Crullers. 

Opiposite the Post Office, 
ANNVILLB, PA. 



J. F. APPLE CO. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

Clasis and Fraternity Pins 

RINGS, MEDALS PRIZE 
CUPS 

Also an Attractive Line of 
STOCK JEWELRY 



CHOICE 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR 
GIFTS 
"HARPEL'S" 

Kodaks and Film Pictures and Frames 



HOW THEY WERE RAISED 

A negro mammy had four boys who were so polite and well- 
behaved that they excited the interest of the mammy's mistress. 

"Mandy," said the mistress one day, "how did you manage to 
raise your boys so well?" 

"Ah' tell you, missus," replied Mandy. "Ah done raised, dem 
boys with a barrel stave, and beliebe me ah sure raised 'em fre- 
quent." 



NEED A NEW TRUNK, BAG, SUIT 
CASE, TRAVELING CASE, 

LEATHER GOODS 
Bicycle and Sporting Goods? 

We carry a fine line of goods. 
PRICES RIGHT QUALITY RIGHT 

E. M. HOTTENSTEIN, 



CUMBERLAND STREET 



LEBANON, PA. 



12 



THE CRUCIBLE 



All American Bath 
and Barber Shop 

H. M. MONFORD, Prop. 

Eagle Hotel Building, Annville 
Penna. 

Bell Phone 

Engagements by Appointment. 

Both Phones 
ASK FOR SIMON P. FEGAN'S 

Soft Drinks 

Manufactured by Simon P. 
Fegan 

536 NORTH EIGHTH ST., 
LEBANON. PA. 




Bell Phone 
SUPERFINE CHOCOLATES, 
BON BONS, CANDY AND ICE 

CREAM 
Fresh Home-Made Candies and 

Ice Cream Daily 
[ce Cream and Candies made 
to order 



SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 

J. F. Vavrous Sons 

512 Cumberland St., 
LEBANON, PA. 



Harvey L. Seltzer 

One Price 

Clothier and Men's 
Furnisher 

"The House of Good Values" 

769 CUMBERLAND ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 

Annville National 
Bank 

of ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Capital Stock ....$100,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided 

Profits $175,2.53.00 



Umbrellas and 
Traveling Goods 

SPORTING GOODS 

E. J. Snavely & Co. 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

FINK'S BAKERY 

for the 

BEST BAKED PRODUCTS 
You Pay for the Articles 
QUALITY and SERVICE 
Cost You Nothing. 



"Stetson" 
Hats 



'Interwoven' 
Hose 



The Men's Shop 

in the Hershey Dept. Store at 
HERSHEY, PA. 

New Styles in Men's Wear 

are here 
While tJhe styles are new — 
njot when they are dead. 



"Hart, Schaffner 
and Marx" 
and 
'Kinschbaum" 
Clothes 



High Grade 
CHOCOLATES 

Maillard's of New York. 

Apollo and Reymer's 
^Fancy Gift Packages : 
A Specialty 
in Vz, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds. 
"Various High Grade 
CONFECTIONS 
always fresh. 
The Store with the Candy with 
tflie snap. 

SHOTT'S 

The Home of Fine Candies. 
Bell 21-3. 127 N. 9th St. 



Quality Service 



BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Pottstown, Pa. 

Reading, Pa. 

Wilmington, Del. 



Quality Service 



JACOB 
SARGENT 

MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

Ready-to- 

Wear 
Clothing 



W. R. WALTZ 
Barber Shop 

WEST MAIN ST., 

Annville, Pa. 



For 
Costumes 
and Caps 
and Gowns 

Write to 

WAAS and 
Son 



LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 
Five Departments 

College, Academy, Music, Oratory 
i and Art 

Grants Bachelor of Arts, Science and Music Degrees. 




For information write 



REV. G. D. GOSSARD, D. D., Pres. 

ANNVILLE, PA.